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AsiaGlobal Voices

Trending Opinions From Across the Region

AsiaGlobal Voices is a curated feed of summaries of opinion articles, columns and editorials published in local languages in media from across Asia.

The publication of AsiaGlobal Voices summaries does not indicate any endorsement by the Asia Global Institute or AsiaGlobal Online of the opinions expressed in them.

DPP Government Harms Taiwan by Promoting Decoupling from the Mainland
Tuesday, September 1, 2020
DPP Government Harms Taiwan by Promoting Decoupling from the Mainland

Xie Nan, Associate Researcher, Institute of Taiwan Studies, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, in Global Times (August 21, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Solomon203)

DPP Government Harms Taiwan by Promoting Decoupling from the Mainland

The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) in Taiwan is increasingly attempting to restrict cross-strait economic, trade and cultural exchanges. The DPP has moved to bar popular mainland streaming services, iQiyi and Tencent’s WeTV, from operating in Taiwan. At the same time, relevant departments have tightened the classification of "mainland capital". At present, the island currently imposes strict regulations on investment from companies that are at least 30 percent mainland-owned.

Streaming services such as iQiyi have contributed to the economic and social development of Taiwan, while at the same time introducing high-quality film and television content to the people, enabling citizens on both sides of the Taiwan Strait to share popular culture. This has helped strengthen cross-strait connections.

The restrictive measures imposed by the DPP represent a form of "ideological leadership" that closely follows the US "anti-China" line, even if this means damaging the real interests of the Taiwan people. Some Taiwan media have labelled the DPP authorities' strict restrictions on investment as "stupid" and "causing harm with no benefits".

Ultimately, the DPP’s strict restrictions on the flow of mainland capital to the island will only succeed in making cross-strait economic and trade interactions more unbalanced. Taiwan’s economic and social development will inevitably struggle as industries will realize how difficult it is to be successful without support from the mainland. Considering the continuous improvement of the mainland's economic and industrial competitiveness, its attractiveness to Taiwan will be enhanced, while Taiwan's economy will struggle. 

The DPP is exposing its weakness by continuing to introduce these "decoupling" measures. In the face of the rise of the mainland, the DPP can only respond with extreme measures. While such a response will create certain obstacles to the development of cross-strait integration, it cannot get in the way of reunification. 


Will There Be Another Financial Crisis?
Tuesday, September 1, 2020
Will There Be Another Financial Crisis?

Kuay Chau Churh, writer, in Oriental Daily (August 21, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: jEd dC)

Will There Be Another Financial Crisis?

The global economic shock of 2020 was not caused by financial speculation or asset bubbles. The black-swan event was that led to it was instead a pandemic and, to control the spread of the virus, almost all countries have adopted a national lockdown policy, restricting international movement and prohibiting many economic activities.

The result of this unprecedented collective shutdown was revealed in the second quarter of 2020 when Malaysia’s GDP fell 17.1 percent year-on-year, setting a record for the worst quarter in history. This forced the central bank to revise its full-year GDP target from the original positive growth rate of 0.5 percent to a contraction of between 3.5 to 5.5 percent.

The ability to stage an economic rebound depends on Covid-19. Any recovery will depend not on its direction or intensity, but instead on when the epidemic can be completely eliminated. Instead of focussing on GDP, it is better to study the debt situation. With a healthy financial situation, anyone can survive the economic downturn.

But household debt is high, accounting for more than 80 percent of GDP. Malaysia’s unemployment rate soared to 5 percent in April, setting a new 30-year high. The job market in the next few months will definitely be bleak, and household financial problems will deepen. Another concern is the housing bubble – more than half of household debt is tied to mortgages.

The central bank will definitely cut interest rates further. If Malaysia is in a low interest rate environment in the next few years, it is conceivable that the banking and financial industries will be hit first. Can the financial system? 

If the economy is to survive, there is no other way than wearing a mask, practicing social distancing and take preventive measures. Only when the epidemic has stabilized can economic affairs recover. 


Clergy in Need during the Pandemic
Monday, August 31, 2020
Clergy in Need during the Pandemic

Kim Jin-ho, chief researcher at The Christian Institute for the Third Era, in The Kyunghyang Shinmun (August 15, 2020)

Summary by Soomi Hong (Photo credit: Puttipong Klinklai / Shutterstock.com)

Clergy in Need during the Pandemic

Covid-19 cases are on the rise again, and this time, clusters have been centered on religious institutions, especially small churches located in the capital. One of the clusters was found to have started with the pastor himself, who is believed to have been infected while working as a salesman.

Clergy holding a paying job outside the church have long been disallowed, but there has been increasing support for permitting this practice in case of dire economic need. According to one study, the average annual household income for a pastor is 17 million won (US$14,500), which is astonishingly low.

The cleric who started the cluster of recent infections is likely to have depended on his second job for financial survival. It is well known that infections tend to break out in the worst type of work conditions and usually these are the only type of employment to which destitute clergy can turn.

Although this is a serious problem not only for public health but for basic human rights of the clergy, there is little being done to alleviate the problem. Every year there are over a thousand churches that cease operations and fewer than three percent of churches survive beyond five years. Nonetheless, the number of religious institutions continues to increase along with the number of closures. Unless this situation is properly addressed, more desperate church leaders might create Covid-19 clusters, which would make all religious institutions look bad.


Foreign Worker Employment: A Modern Form of Slavery
Friday, August 28, 2020
Foreign Worker Employment: A Modern Form of Slavery

Hong Myung-kyo, researcher and activist, in Kyunghyang Shinmun (August 26, 2020)

Summary by Soomi Hong (Photo credit: Jose Antonio Diaz)

Foreign Worker Employment: A Modern Form of Slavery

The Employment Permit System (EPS) in Korea came to existence as a necessary measure following an ugly incident involving harsh public mistreatment of a Bangladesh foreign worker in 2003. It was meant to legalize foreign work permits in specific industries such as manufacturing, construction, agriculture and fisheries, where there is acute shortage of local labor supply. There are an approximate 200,000 foreign workers from 16 Asian countries who are legally employed for three to four-year periods under this system.

The EPS, however, has many flaws, of which the most serious is the restriction on foreign workers from having any say in renewing their work permit. This allows employers to dictate fully often unfair terms of employment in exchange for renewal. Another shortcoming is the restraint on foreign workers from freely changing employment. Currently, foreign workers may not change or terminate employment without pre-approval of the existing employer except for non-payment or outright abuse, for which the foreign worker would bear the burden of proof. According to the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, over 96.5 percent of workers experienced difficulties in changing employment. In many ways, this is a modern form of slavery.

This model of foreign labor extraction to amplify domestic capital accumulation is but a local version of global labor abuse. Similar practices are easily observed in Japan, Taiwan and Hong Kong where foreign workers’ rights to choose better employment, fair working conditions, and a workplace free of abuse are suppressed to varying levels.

Humanity has seen colonization and enslavement during most of 20th century. Sadly, today’s foreign labor system is reminiscent of the old days, with the oppressed continuing to suffer and the oppressors perpetuating an unfair system.


“Mafia” Deals in the Public Healthcare System: In Need of a Better Normal
Tuesday, August 25, 2020
“Mafia” Deals in the Public Healthcare System: In Need of a Better Normal

Michael L Tan, medical anthropologist, veterinarian, and chancellor of the University of the Philippines Diliman from 2014 to 2020, in his column Pinoy Kasi in Philippine Daily Inquirer (August 19, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Ben Pederick/Good Morning Beautiful Films)

“Mafia” Deals in the Public Healthcare System: In Need of a Better Normal

Our chronic problems with PhilHealth and its predecessor Medicare reflect a deeper malaise: our refusal to build a public healthcare system that responds effectively to the needs of people, regardless of their paying capacity. This happened because we insisted on blindly following the US model of healthcare, which has been an abject failure. While Western Europe and many other countries around the globe put up national health services with tax-based benefits so everyone had access to care, we followed the Americans with patients left to pay out of their own pockets, or through expensive insurance.

Think back to scandals like ghost patients in dialysis centers, and the victimizing of senior citizens in urban poor communities, recruited for unnecessary cataract surgeries. “Mafia” deals have eroded PhilHealth’s funds, with predictions that there will be no funds left in a year, this happening during the pandemic.

This is not surprising because the Philippines just does not look at healthcare as a right. Nor do we look at it as an investment. We look at public health as inferior healthcare for the poor so our dismal record handling public-health problems is not surprising. When Covid-19 broke out, our health department abdicated its duties and left them to the military and politicians.

Worse, PhilHealth and Medicare were seen as milking cows for bureaucrats, in collusion with unscrupulous doctors and hospitals. Covid-19 was a wake-up call. The lack of universal healthcare and other social safety nets like unemployment insurance made us so much more vulnerable to the pandemic’s adverse effects. We need a better normal for our social services. We need a public-health system – one that covers the preventive, curative, rehabilitative and promotive aspects of healthcare – supported by well managed funds, and one to which committed and competent health professionals would be drawn to serve.


Turkey’s Erdogan and India’s Modi: Using Religion as a Cover-up
Monday, August 24, 2020
Turkey’s Erdogan and India’s Modi: Using Religion as a Cover-up

Faizul Islam, Treasurer, Bangladesh Development Initiative, in bdnews24.com (August 18, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Prime Minister’s Office)

Turkey’s Erdogan and India’s Modi: Using Religion as a Cover-up

Two headlines – “Erdogan joins thousands in first prayers at Hagia Sophia” and “Modi lays foundation stone for Ram temple in Ayodhya” – have captured international media attention. History is replete with instances of political leaders using their faith to conceal their weaknesses and failures as well as promote their own personal agenda. Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and India’s Narendra Modi join that growing list.

On Ju 24, Erdogan took part along with tens of thousands in Friday prayers in Hagia Sophia, seated on the first row, reciting the Quran in fluent Arabic in a melodious voice. Hagia Sophia was built as a cathedral by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian in 537. The church was converted into a mosque after the 1453 Ottoman conquest of Istanbul. The founding leader of the secular Turkish republic, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, converted the mosque into a museum in 1934.

In July, ignoring criticism from around the world, Erdogan issued a decree restoring the iconic building as a mosque, soon after a Turkish high court ruled that the Hagia Sophia had been illegally made into a museum more than 80 years ago.

A similar scenario just took place in India. On Aug 5, Modi offered prayers and laid a ceremonial foundation stone for a grand Hindu temple at the site believed to be the birthplace of Lord Ram in Uttar Pradesh’s river city of Ayodhya. Hindus believe Muslims built a mosque – the Babri Mosque – over the temple in the 16th century.

In essence, the Hagia Sophia or the Ayodhya Hindu temple as religious edifices demonstrate that political leaders will use their religion to change the narrative of the time and engage in cultural wars to promote their self-interest.


The Mass Party and the Digitalization of Politics
Friday, August 21, 2020
The Mass Party and the Digitalization of Politics

Aasim Sajjad Akhtar, Associate Professor of Political Economy, National Institute of Pakistan Studies, Quaid-i-Azam University, in Dawn (August 21, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: @Ahm4dJamal)

The Mass Party and the Digitalization of Politics

Popular politics used to be the preserve of mass political organizations that could legitimately claim to represent the interests of significant sections of the population. The idea of the mass party was inextricably tied to democratic statecraft.

Some would argue that this idea is now dead. Even though Pakistan has always been dominated by an authoritarian and militarized state that sabotaged democratic politics, mass political parties have thrived. The field of politics has been transformed by digital technology with profound implications. Digitalization allows for millions of people to articulate themselves politically and highlight the injustices and inequalities that litter our social landscape. Yet it also reinforces the feeling that mainstream political parties are at best unable and at worst unconcerned with what takes place at the grassroots.

The ruling Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) certainly claims the mantle of a popular mass party. But it is far more accurate to describe it at as an agglomeration of entrenched “electables” that has nevertheless been able to project itself as a mass organization on the basis of successful media projection and active digital cadres. It relies on tried and tested signifiers like “corruption” and “national security” even as it benefits from a youth bulge that has been bred on an anti-politics narrative championed by our own establishment and emblematic of neoliberal “governance” around the world.

The vision of rule by a popular and progressive majority has been displaced by institutional and subjective logics that are producing majoritarian tyranny. It may not be possible to reconstitute the mass par­ty of the 20th century. Pakistanis who want to overturn the establishment-centric system and institute genuine economic and political democracy have to think more deeply about building a meaningful political form rather than limiting themselves to outrage in an online space already dominated by the right.


New Government: Reaching Out to Unify the Nation
Friday, August 21, 2020
New Government: Reaching Out to Unify the Nation

Jehan Perera, Executive Director, National Peace Council of Sri Lanka, in The Island (August 18, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Sagara Lakmal de Mel/President’s Media Division)

New Government: Reaching Out to Unify the Nation

Much is hoped for from the new government which triumphed with an unprecedented majority. There was an expectation of new faces who would be equipped with the professionalism that President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has brought. However, the exigencies of politics and the need to reward loyalty and those who can bring in votes appear to have prevailed over professional competence.

Most of the ministers selected are from the past, including those accused of offences and have cases in the courts. Particularly disappointing has been the failure to appoint women, with only one of 27 cabinet ministers a woman. The minister of women’s affairs is a man not known to be a specialist in gender equity.

One silver lining is that the number of ministers was kept to under 30. Another encouraging action was the appointment of Mohamed Ali Sabry as minister of justice. By doing this, the government ensured that the cabinet will be multi-ethnic and multi-religious. Muslims have been the target of hate and vilification by extremists mainly from the Sinhalese community. There is a lack of politicians who can reach out to minorities to make them feel included. During the campaign, no major party proposed how they would bridge ethnic and religious divides.

The need for national reconciliation continues. Despite the gains by the ruling party and its allies, the electoral map continues to show signs of division. The government’s approach to national reconciliation will lie through economic development which requires both political stability and an assurance that those who invest will be protected by the law. Ensuring a balance between the imperatives of justice, the rule of law and national reconciliation are the prerequisites for economic development if Sri Lanka is to live up to its potential in a way that it never did in the past.


At This Turning Point, Take Control of Our Own Destiny
Friday, August 21, 2020
At This Turning Point, Take Control of Our Own Destiny

Goh Choon Kang, former journalist and member of the Singapore Parliament from 1984 to 199, in Lianhe Zaobao (August 19, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Prime Minister’s Office Singapore)

At This Turning Point, Take Control of Our Own Destiny

Looking back on the history of Singapore, the process from colony to independence involved coping with continual challenges against a fate that was constantly evolving. Today’s Singapore is the result of its successful response to surviving these challenges. After the division of Singapore and Malaysia, there was no choice but to find a new way to survive and, if it were not for such a group of visionary political leaders, Singapore’s fate would not be what it is today.

The Covid-19 pandemic is yet another major test facing Singapore and all countries. Some may still not yet grasp the seriousness of the problem and fail to realize that this is a life-and-death challenge – another turning point in Singapore’s destiny. The world now is pinning their hope on a vaccine, which is impossible in the short term. Instead, society should actively seek a way out instead of just waiting anxiously. Singaporeans must take control of their own destiny.

During this global crisis all countries share the common desire to seek a solution. This presents a great opportunity and there exists some prospect for a way out. Minister of Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing talked about some of the strategies the government plans to adopt, including signing digital free-trade agreements with other countries and working with like-minded nations such as New Zealand and Chile to promote jointly the global digital economy and establish so-called "green channels". These all require not just hard work and perseverance but also wisdom and foresight. This is why Singapore needs a strong team to govern the country.

 


Censoring the President for his own Good
Wednesday, August 19, 2020
Censoring the President for his own Good

Manuel L Quezon III, writer and television host, in Philippine Daily Inquirer (August 12, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Minette Rimando/ILO)

Censoring the President for his own Good

In the past, a late-night television appearance by President Rodrigo Duterte would have been a major event. But times have changed. The president recently made an appearance, but the spirit of the times is such that, in mid-rant about his wives, state media cut him off, abruptly ending the broadcast. The government was having to censor its chief executive for his own – and his administration’s – good.

From the start of his administration through the mid-term, academics and analysts would outdo each other in arguing that the president was far more cunning, crafty, consistent and capable than people assumed. The president is none of the above, but instead is a member of a petty provincial dynasty long used to doing a minimum of executive work by bullying and blustering his way out of every predicament. And has quite a chip on his shoulder not least because his bark and bluster disguises weak leadership. Having been forced to resume the pandemic lockdown in Manila and then rambling on air to cover his helplessness, the people saw through the act. State media dared to do what they have never done to a sitting president – kick him off the air in mid-sentence.

A rumor has been circulating that the armed forces would be unable to meet its payroll. This was denied, but the seriousness of the fiscal situation was underscored by the president himself. Fitch Ratings has warned that the government might be forced to spend more on fighting the pandemic and to help revive the economy. There will be even more pressure to spend if the recovery stalls, it added.

Besides bayonets, it is the fiscal stick that is the most potent in the arsenal of any president. But with empty coffers, even the reliability of bayonets becomes shaky.


Lotus to POTUS: How Kamala Harris Might Bloom
Tuesday, August 18, 2020
Lotus to POTUS: How Kamala Harris Might Bloom

Chidanand Rajghatta, Foreign Editor based in Washington, DC, in The Times of India (August 17, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Gage Skidmore)

Lotus to POTUS: How Kamala Harris Might Bloom

Traditionally, American vice-presidents were considered so nondescript and superfluous that Thomas Marshall, the country’s 28th VP, joked about two brothers, one who ran away to sea, the other who became vice-president: Neither of them was ever heard from again. Franklin Roosevelt’s first veep, John Nance Garner, said the title was not worth “a bucket of warm spit”.

The choice of Kamala Harris as Joe Biden’s running mate sends a different message. The US has had 45 presidents and 48 vice-presidents, none women. Only 14 veeps have gone on to become presidents, nine of them after the president’s death.

The Biden-Harris team offers a ticket to unprecedented history should it be victorious. Veeps go on to become presidents in the worst of circumstances, not necessarily in better circumstances. Biden himself, after serving two terms as Barack Obama’s veep, had to defer to Hillary Clinton’s bid for the party nomination in 2016, choosing “dignity over ambition” when he realized the odds were stacked against him. Harris, the first putative female veep of Black and Indian heritage, is viewed in some quarters as a possible regent under any circumstances for a man who would be the oldest president to be sworn into office – if he wins.


Urgently Rethink Pandemic Policies - or the Future is Bleak
Tuesday, August 18, 2020
Urgently Rethink Pandemic Policies - or the Future is Bleak

Kavi Chongkittavorn, journalist and commentator on regional affairs, in Bangkok Post (August 11, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Madelline Romero/PSI)

Urgently Rethink Pandemic Policies - or the Future is Bleak

Thailand's future might well be in danger if the government does not take urgent action to recalibrate its anti-pandemic policies. All the excellent measures the concerned authorities, as well as the public, have taken in mitigating the coronavirus over the past six months could easily turn against them. Thailand could emerge from Covid-19 with more disgruntled Thais including those who were repatriated. Worse, there will likely be additional unhappy foreign countries including their diplomats and citizens who have encountered discrimination.

Two important trends must be considered. First, public expectations are so high that any new community transmissions will not be tolerated. For the past 78 days, not a single local case has been reported. Thailand has been touted by the international community as one of the world's top countries in containing the virus. Second, the Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration (CCSA) has been tough in handling foreign visitors, causing protests from the diplomatic community. This could have far-reaching repercussions for the country's economic recovery plans.

It will be imperative to educate the Thai public about the situation instead of focusing on the numbers. The CCSA must know how to manage public expectations. Any new cases popping up with more easing of lockdown could have a devastating effect on the government's image and stability. It will ignite a new cycle of the blame game among stakeholders and politicians.

Thailand should learn from Vietnam, Germany, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea and Singapore that opening up the country carries some risks – namely new infections no matter how efficient the preventive measures are – but it is essential to kickstart the country's economic recovery in the "new normal" era. Public understanding of this is essential, otherwise, the future is bleak.


The Dilemma Facing the Malaysian Chinese
Monday, August 17, 2020
The Dilemma Facing the Malaysian Chinese

黄瑞泰, middle school teacher and a committee member of the Kuala Lumpur and Selangor Chinese Assembly Hall, Oriental Daily (August 15, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Jorge Láscar)

The Dilemma Facing the Malaysian Chinese

In Malaysia, the dilemma of the Malaysian Chinese is that, to live in peace as citizens, they need constantly to show their non-threatening loyalty.

Today's Malaysian Chinese society has two ways to face this dilemma. The first is to welcome the rise of China, hoping that this will increase the voices of Malaysian Chinese. This approach, however, not only fails to tackle the dilemma but also makes the situation increasingly complicated and awkward. The culture of the Chinese in Malaysia has long a history, and over the years, a Chinese culture unique to Malaysia has developed. The rise of China has led to a weakening of Chinese ways of living in Malaysia. As a result, many have embraced China, deepening the dilemma faced by the Malaysian Chinese community.

The second way is to reflect on the uniqueness of the Malaysian Chinese themselves and seek ways for the community to capture the local characteristics of Malaysia. This involves establishing and fostering uniqueness, a Malaysian Chinese ethos that integrates different ethnic cultures.

While the strength of China will inevitably bring huge changes, this may not necessarily help the Malaysian Chinese community to resolve their dilemma. They should work to wipe out completely the boundaries between them and promote the idea of a strong family.


Human Rights: Was Giving the Ruling Party Another Landslide Win Worth It?
Monday, August 10, 2020
Human Rights: Was Giving the Ruling Party Another Landslide Win Worth It?

Myagmardorj Buyanjargal, writer, in The UB Post (August 7, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Sasha India)

Human Rights: Was Giving the Ruling Party Another Landslide Win Worth It?

It is not necessary to explain how the ruling Mongolian People’s Party (MPP) won another landslide victory in the parliamentary elections. But consider the polls from a human rights perspective.

The most recent potential human-rights violation of the government is that it let a Mongolian woman and male driver stay in no-man’s-land for two days, refusing to let them enter their home country. The student had travelled from the Czech Republic since the government’s efforts to bring back citizens from abroad due to Covid-19 have been dismally slow.

When a large number of Mongolians were demanding that authorities let her in, she was stuck between Mongolia and Russia because customs authorities told her to go back to Russia. While the authenticity of this explanation may be in question, no reasonable man would be surprised if this explanation was authentic as the government closed the border indefinitely in mid-March. We perhaps need to remember that the Constitution prohibits the extradition and exile of citizens to any other country in any case.

Another very clear example of human rights violations would be the decisions issued by the State Emergency Commission (SEC) and the Mayor of Ulaanbaatar ordering mayors of districts not to accept any request to organize any kind of meeting, including peaceful gatherings and protests. According to the Constitution, citizens shall be guaranteed the privilege to enjoy “freedom of thought, free expression of opinion, speech, press, peaceful demonstration and meetings”.

If we follow this pattern of a quiet “abuse” of human rights, it started even before the election. When the authorities have things to hide, most likely there will be human rights violations. Is this the beginning of a gradual undermining of human rights? If so, was it worth giving the MPP another landslide victory?


Under the King’s Guidance, Covid-19 Strategies Have Succeeded
Monday, August 10, 2020
Under the King’s Guidance, Covid-19 Strategies Have Succeeded

Chenkyab Dorji, diplomat, in Kuensel (August 8, 2020)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Thomas Trunk/123RF)

Under the King’s Guidance, Covid-19 Strategies Have Succeeded

The first confirmed case of Covid-19 in Bhutan was detected on 6 March 2020. Since then, under the enlightened leadership and personal guidance of His Majesty The King, the government has taken many steps to mitigate risks and prevent the transmission and spread of the disease in the country. In fact, His Majesty was already aware of the risks and challenges that Covid-19 could pose to the people and country even before the detection of the first confirmed case and was pro-actively preparing response plans and strategies.

Bhutan’s preparedness, response strategies and efforts have been lauded as many steps were taken in a proactive manner despite the fact that there was no local transmission in the country. Covid-19 has brought the country together to combat and overcome one of the greatest challenges of our times. The swift and deliberate manner with which Bhutan acted to prepare and respond while countries in the region and beyond were overwhelmed by the pandemic is noteworthy, particularly given our constraints and limited resources.

Going forward, what is important and imperative is for each and every citizen to be responsible by supporting the efforts of the Royal Government to prevent local/community transmission. As a senior citizen, I urge and appeal to all Bhutanese to be responsible and comply with health advisories such as wearing face masks, washing hands frequently and physical distancing. The Druk Trace App is an extremely important tool for contact tracing and must be used whenever visiting any public place.

We all have a solemn responsibility, individually and collectively, to prevent the transmission and spread of Covid-19. We cannot afford to become complacent, irresponsible or reckless. We must continue to work together with steadfast resolve and unity of purpose to protect our communities and our nation.