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AsiaGlobal Voices

Trending Opinions From Across the Region

AsiaGlobal Voices is a curated feed of summaries of opinion articles, columns and editorials published in local languages in media from across Asia.

The publication of AsiaGlobal Voices summaries does not indicate any endorsement by the Asia Global Institute or AsiaGlobal Online of the opinions expressed in them.

The Level Of Covid-19 Awareness Is Worrying
Monday, March 8, 2021
The Level Of Covid-19 Awareness Is Worrying

Zheng Liting is a freelance writer, in Oriental Daily (December 5, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: jEd dC)

The Level Of Covid-19 Awareness Is Worrying

Among 53 countries, Malaysia was 29th on Bloomberg’s Covid Resilience ranking. This is in stark contrast to when a Japanese thinktank ranked Malaysia second out of 49 countries. Today, Malaysia’s handling of Covid-19 can be described as a catastrophe.

New Zealand, which ranked first in Bloomberg ranking, decided to implement a national lockdown before there were any deaths in the country, even though tourism is the economy’s biggest export industry. When the second wave of the epidemic broke out in Auckland, the country's largest city, a strict lockdown was enforced.

Malaysia’s government, by contrast, did not introduce any movement control orders when a third wave took hold. The population continued their daily routines, travelling and shopping, in the belief Covid-19 had been eliminated. Even though the Klang Valley (the area around Kuala Lumpur) was eventually placed under a Conditional Movement Control Order (CMCO) lasting seven weeks, the situation has continued to deteriorate rapidly. So, what was the point of the CMCOs?

Many citizens are demanding an end to the implementation of the CMCOs as they are leading many businesses to go bankrupt. But if the movement control order is not implemented, people will not grasp the seriousness of the situation. The fact that the Covid-19 crisis has reached the point it has is certainly the responsibility of the society’s lack of awareness towards Covid-19. Everyone wants to return to normal life, but this will require everyone to improve their awareness on how to fight this deadly virus


President Duterte’s Drug War is a Failure
Friday, March 5, 2021
President Duterte’s Drug War is a Failure

Ramon T Tulfo, TV host, radio broadcaster and columnist, in The Manila Times (March 4, 2021)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: VOCAL-NY)

President Duterte’s Drug War is a Failure

President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs is an utter failure. The president made wrong choices of officials. The appointments give credence to the truism that close relatives or friends make lousy subordinates or business partners. Had they carried Mr Duterte’s marching orders to rid the country of the drug menace by catching or eliminating the big fish, there would have been no need to eliminate the small fry or pushers in the streets. The big fish have not been caught and are laughing all the way to the bank.

Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra seems to go against the Duterte administration’s mindset when he told the United Nations Human Rights Council that more than half of thousands of anti-drug operations under the present administration failed to comply with rules of engagement and protocol. That statement was shocking but true.

Had Guevarra been appointed justice secretary earlier, he could have guided the President in the war on drugs. The Philippines would not have become a pariah in the free world had he appointed Guevarra in the early part of his administration.

Duterte was too preoccupied with his job as president to notice the vulgar ways of the police in exterminating heinous criminals. The president should have realized that what was once good and accepted in Davao City where he was mayor can no longer be applied in the whole country.

But all is not lost. The president can still appoint people in key positions who were not his friends when he was mayor of Davao.


Demonstrate the Safety of the Covid-19 Vaccines
Friday, March 5, 2021
Demonstrate the Safety of the Covid-19 Vaccines

Goh Choon Kang, former journalist and member of the Singapore Parliament from 1984 to 1997, in Lianhe Zaobao (December 16, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: eldar nurkovic / Shutterstock.com)

Demonstrate the Safety of the Covid-19 Vaccines

The unprecedented speed at which Covid-19 vaccines have been developed has made many people question their safety and reliability with rumors and conspiracy theories widely circulating online. This highlights the need to demonstrate scientifically the effectiveness of the vaccines without political interference.

Some experts still have some doubts about the vaccine due to limited data and uncertainty over side effects. When an external panel of experts from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted on the emergency use of Pfizer's vaccine, 17 people voted in favor but four opposed and one abstained. The same cautious attitudes can be found around the world. In Singapore, a survey showed that only 48 percent of the respondents would be willing to receive a vaccination as soon as possible while another poll found that nearly 20 percent do not want to be vaccinated.

To reassure the public, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong announced that he and his cabinet would receive the vaccination in public. The government should do more to increase its publicity efforts and proactively persuade people to get vaccinated. Experts in the US believe that, to control the epidemic, around 70 percent of people need to be vaccinated. Nevertheless, it is still a wise decision not to make vaccination compulsory. The World Health Organization opposes mandatory universal vaccination.

Ultimately, it is unrealistic to expect that the pandemic will be fully controlled as soon as the vaccine is available. Singaporeans must continue to pay attention to personal hygiene, maintain social distancing, and wear masks.


For More Online Civility, We Need Deeper Engagement and Careful Legislation
Tuesday, March 2, 2021
For More Online Civility, We Need Deeper Engagement and Careful Legislation

Malavika Raghavan, lawyer, in The Indian Express (March 1, 2021)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: European Union 2016 - European Parliament)

For More Online Civility, We Need Deeper Engagement and Careful Legislation

The Narendra Modi administration announced a regime for India’s internet intermediaries and digital media. Some changes to our current legal landscape were inevitable, given the negative impact of social media and digital platforms on recent events, ranging from a celebrity’s suicide to a young person’s environmental activism. But the government’s rules in reaction to these and other events raise many questions.

A key issue that is raising eyebrows is the use of government powers to regulate intermediaries to create rules for publishers of content. Under the new rules, publishers of online “news and current affairs content” and “online curated content” will be subject to a code of ethics, a redress and content-takedown mechanism and an oversight framework. This raises the big question of whether such publishers can be regulated in ways akin to “intermediaries”.

No doubt serious suspicions have been raised in recent months regarding the ability of intermediaries to selectively highlight or bury content. But it appears hard to justify regulating publishers (who create content such as written publications, podcasts, videos or audio content) using the power to regulate intermediaries.

Online digital news sources and content producers have created new spaces in India for creativity and free expression. We have also seen the rise of outfits that generate “alternative facts” and realities that often polarize and vitiate public debate. While some codes of ethics or rules are necessary to combat misinformation, fake news or propaganda online, the regulation of publishers of original content raises questions around policing speech and expression.

Ultimately, the government needs to find different hammers, tools and railings to create a safe space for users. A wider toolkit is necessary for the government to build a framework that respects Indians who use these platforms and the collective online public and private spheres we are building together.


Redesign City Parks During the Pandemic
Tuesday, March 2, 2021
Redesign City Parks During the Pandemic

Jang Byoung-kwan, Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture, Daegu University, in Maeil News (January 30, 2021)

Summary by Soomi Hong

Redesign City Parks During the Pandemic

Social distancing is widely understood to be the most effective method of containing a pandemic. This policy is expected to persist for some time to come. In view of this, many parks have been pre-emptively closed to deter people from congregating. Although this makes sense, especially since most parks in Korea are designed to be public squares, conducive for big gatherings, for many working and residing in high-density cities, parks are the only venues where they can disconnect from the crowd and unburden themselves.

Given the current situation, the question of how to optimize parks to make them both safe and effective has been an issue for cities in many countries. One of the most important elements of a successful park is the design of walkways, ideally paths along which one could spend 20 to 30 minutes by oneself without encountering anyone else. Strategic design of these walkways along with thematic fountains, scenic flower bed and solo benches is so important but is sadly missing in many parks in Korea.

In times when people are encouraged to minimize social contact, it has become ever more important for people to get out of crowded apartments units and enjoy themselves in the outdoors. In view of this, local governments must reconsider the current policy of keeping parks shut and evaluate the possibility of opening more public spaces in a safe and organized way. If opening the parks in their current layout is not an option, it might be advisable to consider developing more trails in the nearby mountains and forests for citizens in this time of physical and mental stress. Covid-19 will be a long-term problem. We should brace ourselves and invest in what will help us get through the crisis.


Who is Winning the Park Chung-hee vs Kim Il-sung Battle?
Wednesday, February 24, 2021
Who is Winning the Park Chung-hee vs Kim Il-sung Battle?

Lee Dae-hyun, editor, in Maeil News (January 23, 2021)

Summary by Soomi Hong (Photo credit: Shin So-young)

Who is Winning the Park Chung-hee vs Kim Il-sung Battle?

The two people who have had the most influence on the Korean Peninsula in the last century are arguably Park Chung-hee of the South and Kim Il-sung of the North. The two never met but had significant influence in the trajectory of the two countries.

In many ways, Park laid the ground for the South’s miraculous economic growth with his five-year economic plan, the Saemaul Undong (New Community Movement), and the export-driven growth policy. His priorities allowed the South to overtake the North in the economic development race: the South’s GDP per capita increased twentyfold from US$82 in 1961 to US$1,640 dollars in 1979. During the same period, the North’s increased from US$195 dollars to US$1,114.

Today’s numbers serve as even starker evidence of Kim’s utter defeat in the competition with Park. According to the latest statistics, the South’s GDP is estimated to be 54 times the North’s, its GDP per capita 27 times, and the total trade volume 322 times. Life expectancy of North Koreans is 66.7 for men and 73.5 for women, while in the South it is 80 for men and 85.9 for women.

Despite these numbers, the reality is less clear about who the true winner might be. The South continues to tolerate the North’s unacceptable insults and nuclear threats. Whereas the North is currently ruled by Kim’s grandson, the South is being governed by those who would much prefer to erase the memory of Park from history. There is no guarantee as to how the North-South battle will play out in the future. Now, from their respective places in the afterlife, perhaps it is Kim who is triumphant and Park who is the frustrated one. 


Build A Northeast Asian Anti-Covid-19 Alliance
Wednesday, February 24, 2021
Build A Northeast Asian Anti-Covid-19 Alliance

Meng Yueming, researcher at the Northeast Asia Institute of the Liaoning Academy of Social Sciences, in Global Times (December 16, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: goleiro35 / Shutterstock.com)

Build A Northeast Asian Anti-Covid-19 Alliance

Covid-19 is a threat to not only human life but also economic growth, regional cooperation and effective global governance. China, Japan and South Korea initially established a similar approach to tackling the pandemic. Due to the arrival of winter and the colder climate, South Korea and Japan are now seeing a resurgence in Covid-19 cases. As such, building a closer anti-Covid-19 alliance in Northeast Asia is the best way forward.

As all three countries were relatively successful in the early stages of managing the pandemic, they established an agreement for business exchanges to continue. Trade and economic cooperation also saw a recovery, notably supported by the formal signing of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), allowing the three countries to establish bilateral tariff reduction deals for the first time.

The three countries should strengthen their coordination capabilities for controlling the spread of Covid-19 by employing thee following mechanisms:

First, the ‘business tracks” already in place are an effective means to maintain economic and trade cooperation and people exchanges. The arrangement was successfully maintained during a second wave of the virus in South Korea and should be kept up. Meanwhile, business cooperation models such as cross-border e-commerce, digital economy and video conferencing that adapt to the situation should also be enhanced.

Second, all three countries should continue to develop emergency response mechanisms, implement joint prevention and control measures, and strengthen the exchange of information. Cooperation in the fields of diagnosis and treatment programs, vaccine research and development should be maintained.

Finally, we will have to live with the virus for a long time before effective vaccines are deployed globally. China, Japan and South Korea, therefore, should conduct further joint prevention and control measures, share experiences, provide assistance, carry out scientific and technological research, and establish more regional public-health cooperation mechanisms.


When Will The Government Stop Using the Emergency Law?
Wednesday, February 24, 2021
When Will The Government Stop Using the Emergency Law?

Allan Au Ka-lun, journalist, in Apple Daily (December 24, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Jimmy Siu / Shutterstock.com)

When Will The Government Stop Using the Emergency Law?

Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal (CFA) has ruled that the government's decision to use the Emergency Regulations Ordinance (ERO), a colonial-era law, to ban face masks at demonstrations and public meetings during the height of the 2019 pro-democracy protests was constitutional and aimed to prevent any gathering from deteriorating into violence.

Pro-democracy activists had sought a judicial review on the grounds that the emergency law gave the government too much power. The CFA, however, concluded that the Legislative Council (Legco), the Basic Law and the judicial system could still effectively "restrict" government powers. But this statement is out of touch for thinking that Legco is a normal legislative body, ignoring that it has always been weak in checks and balances, and has become more of a rubber stamp.

The strangest part of the judgment was where the CFA discussed whether the decision to ban facemasks was constitutional and reasonable. This, however, relates to the specific "emergency" period in 2019 and today, more than a year later, there is no such situation in Hong Kong. Yet the law remains in place. This is clearly excessive and disproportionate, and the CFA has failed to deal with this issue.

How long will the Hong Kong government keep invoking the ERO? The power to abolish the mask law is in the hands of Legco and government.


The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership Means Win-Win Cooperation
Wednesday, February 24, 2021
The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership Means Win-Win Cooperation

Felinka Zhou Fan, director of a corporate advisory service company, in Lianhe Zaobao (December 2, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Prachatai)

The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership Means Win-Win Cooperation

Leaders of 15 Asia-Pacific nations have signed the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) agreement, which represents roughly 30 percent of the world’s GDP and population.

Amid a more and more complex backdrop where Covid-19 continues to affect global economic activity, the signing of RCEP represents the determination of these countries to develop free trade, multilateralism and regional economic integration. For international investors outside the RCEP, entering into agreements with any country in the RCEP will be equivalent to entering the entire regional market, which will not only significantly enhance the commercial attractiveness of the region but also help stimulate the recovery of the global economy.

According to the RCEP agreement, at least 92 percent of the tariffs on traded goods will be eliminated between member states. Singapore’s exports to other member states will also enjoy additional preferential treatment. This will reduce tariff costs for businesses and increase profit margins. Meanwhile at least 65 percent of service industries will be fully opened, increasing the ratio of foreign shareholding.

Before the signing of RCEP, economic interactions between China and ASEAN member states, especially Singapore, were already relatively close. Singapore's attractive business environment helped attract many Chinese companies to invest and develop in Singapore, with more than 7,500 Chinese enterprises registered. Chinese enterprises have also accelerated their entry into the ASEAN market in recent years. This has been somewhat imbalanced, however.

Through the implementation of RCEP, achieving multilateral and win-win cooperation will be even more achievable. Meanwhile the relationship between China and ASEAN will be more balanced and all members of RCEP will be able to achieve common development within a harmonious ecosystem.


Diversity as a Core Value is Key to Relations with the US
Monday, February 22, 2021
Diversity as a Core Value is Key to Relations with the US

Akimoto Satohiro, Chairman and President, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, in The Japan Times (February 11, 2021)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Sikarin Thanachaiary/World Economic Forum)

Diversity as a Core Value is Key to Relations with the US

A key component in understanding US President Joe Biden’s foreign policy is diversity. Biden has made clear that inclusivity and diversity will be core values of his administration. In addition to his choice of Kamala Harris as vice president, he appointed five women, three Latinos, two Blacks, one Native American and one openly gay person to Cabinet posts. Biden appointed women and minorities to key positions in the administration. Biden elevated diversity to the top of his foreign policy agenda. On February 5, he issued a historically important memorandum committing the United States to LGBTQ rights in the international community.

Japan should take note. Diversity is an element that Japan has not fully grasped yet as part of the bilateral relationship. This is something Japan needs to work on, as diversity in the modern Western sense is still not a main part of Japan’s main political discourse. The US and Japan may share many fundamental values such as democracy, freedom and the rule of law, but their respective societies differ on the matter of race and ethnic diversity.

The gender gap remains wide in Japan, where traditional gender roles persist. Take the comments on women made by Mori Yoshiro, who serves as the Tokyo Olympics games chief. Mori was quoted as saying that women talk too much. He issued an apology for making “inappropriate remarks”.

Japan should take this incident seriously and learn from it so that Japan engages the Biden administration on the same wavelength. Diversity has become a fact of life and a core political value in America, along with democracy, freedom, rule of law, free enterprise and transparency. If Tokyo recognizes this and promotes diversity as a universal value, it will not only strengthen Tokyo’s relationship with Washington but also bolster Japan’s standing in the international community.


What the Disengagement With China Means for Asian Geopolitics
Friday, February 19, 2021
What the Disengagement With China Means for Asian Geopolitics

C Uday Bhaskar, retired naval officer and Director, Society for Policy Studies, in Hindustan Times (February 16, 2021)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: Vir Nakai)

What the Disengagement With China Means for Asian Geopolitics

Defence Minister Rajnath Singh announced the disengagement of troops by both China and India at the contested Pangong lake. This development is cause for modest satisfaction.

It is significant that China has agreed to pull back from a position of relative tactical advantage. Will the current disengagement and the acceptance of a temporary suspension by India of patrolling rights in one area lead to greater malleability in managing the Line of Actual Control (LAC) – remember China has been reluctant to clarify the LAC despite repeated Indian attempts – and provide a roadmap towards an agreed border? That would be the most desirable outcome, in which case the compromise by India would be a prudent political determination. An equitable and consensually settled border remains the Holy Grail for Delhi.

However, if this is only a brief pause for Beijing and President Xi Jinping as China prepares for a major political event — the July centenary celebrations of the Communist Party of China — and the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) subsequently reverts to its pattern of territorial assertiveness. Delhi may rue the accommodations it has made in the disengagement process.

Whatever the outcome, it will have an impact on external interlocutors such as the US, Russia and China’s other neighbors. While Delhi’s resolve to resist Beijing’s aggressive bellicosity will be noted by the smaller nations, the Delhi-Beijing dynamic will also shape – and be shaped by – the US-China-India triangle. President Joe Biden has signaled that the US will hold Beijing’s feet to the fire over the Indo-Pacific and the principles of freedom of navigation and territorial integrity, with a continued focus on reinvigorating Quad. How China reads this message, and how it orients itself in relation to contested territoriality will shape many outcomes in Asia and beyond. Pangong is the bellwether.


Myanmar Coup Is An Echo Of May 2014
Thursday, February 18, 2021
Myanmar Coup Is An Echo Of May 2014

Pravit Rojanaphruk, Senior Staff Writer, in Khaosod (February 5, 2021)

Summary by Alejandro Reyes (Photo credit: ฮินะจัง เชียงใหม่)

Myanmar Coup Is An Echo Of May 2014

The military coup in Myanmar sent a political ripple through Thailand, its next-door neighbor, not because of any immediate influx of political asylum seekers (yet) but for the similar fate the two countries share. Nearly seven years after Thailand’s 2014 coup, which is unlikely to be the last, junta leader Gen Prayut Chan-ocha is still in power, albeit as prime minister of an elected government after elections in March 2019.

Thais, particularly those supporting democracy could not help but feel sorry about what is happening next door and consider what they can do about it. They are aware that Burmese were quick to denounce the coup in droves, despite the more ruthless reputation of the Burmese military generals compared to Thai generals. Politicians, academics, doctors, nurses, stars, models and flight attendants protested. In Thailand in 2014, too few people were willing to come out to denounce the coup. Spreading on social media after the Myanmar coup was this comment: “If Thais don’t fight, we will remain like slaves. If Burmese don’t fight, they will remain like Thais”.

It is now up to young Thais to decide what kind of neighbors they would like to be, what kind of people-to-people relations they want to have with those in Myanmar facing military suppression. Will it be one of apathy, selfish ASEAN non-interference, or that of empathy and solidarity? Will Thais simply sit and watch the suppression of political rights in Myanmar unfold and say it is just like domestic violence next door so let them sort it out – or will they do what they can to help stop the rape and abuse? The past few days have been encouraging, but this is just the beginning as more are being arrested in Myanmar for taking a stance against illegitimate military rule.


For the Foreseeable Future, Global Financial Center Status is Secure
Thursday, February 18, 2021
For the Foreseeable Future, Global Financial Center Status is Secure

Shih Wing-ching, Chief Executive, Centaline Group, in am730 (December 16, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Alejandro Reyes)

For the Foreseeable Future, Global Financial Center Status is Secure

Opposition figures who have fled overseas continue to lobby Western governments to sanction Hong Kong in the belief that if Hong Kong’s global financial center status would be threatened and the Special Administrative Region (SAR) government would be forced to give in. Furthermore, they believe that if Hong Kong loses this position, it will become a burden to China. 

Beijing understands that the various restrictive measures adopted by the US in the past have not been effective and have sometimes even backfired. For example, when the US announced measures to restrict Chinese companies from listing in the US, many Chinese companies decided to list in Hong Kong instead. Many Chinese companies then chose Hong Kong as their secondary listing market. This resulted in a substantial increase in trading volume on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Financial circles in the US are now starting to worry that New York's status as an international financial center cannot be maintained without Chinese firms being allowed to go public in the US.

Chinese companies have a huge domestic market, impressive returns and strong competitiveness in the international market. Investors will not give up investing in Chinese companies simply because of the opposition of the US government. For this reason, many international-level investment banks expect that funds will gradually flow out of the US market and into the Chinese market (including Hong Kong). This scenario is completely different from Hong Kong's losing its status as a financial center.

Ultimately, financial centers respond to the real economy. As long as Hong Kong can continue to provide better property-rights protection, a freer trading environment, and a higher level of rule of law, Hong Kong's status as a global financial center is safe for the foreseeable future.


Cooperate To Develop Sustainable Transportation
Wednesday, February 17, 2021
Cooperate To Develop Sustainable Transportation

Aw Kah Peng, Chairman, Shell Companies in Singapore, in Lianhe Zaobao (December 24, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Jason Goh/Pixabay)

Cooperate To Develop Sustainable Transportation

The future of Singapore's transportation sector will depend upon innovation and sustainability. Over the next 50 years, a major challenge facing Singapore will be how to provide clean, economical and reliable energy.

Singapore’s governance advantages include a focus on long-term planning. In 2020, the government launched a sustainable transportation vision, which included the phasing out of all internal combustion engine cars by 2040. The enhanced vehicle emission reduction tax plan implemented from January 1, 2021, will further narrow the price gap between electric vehicles and internal combustion engine vehicles.

The government also announced a three-year incentive to encourage consumers to purchase electric vehicles. They plan to expand the electric vehicle charging network to 28,000 charging stations by 2030. In addition to electric vehicles, hydrogen and liquefied natural gas are also designated as important sources of future energy to meet the needs of heavy vehicles.

To popularize electric vehicles, Singapore requires the corresponding infrastructure, including a robust national power grid. The government must also continue to control vehicle growth through measures such as quotas and land-use restrictions, while increasing the use of car-sharing services. In addition, the government should use data and digital technology to expand and improve the public transportation system, while encouraging more people to abandon private cars. This would support the government's goal of ensuring that by 2030 80 percent of Singapore households will be within a 10-minute walk to a subway train station.

As Singapore intensifies its efforts to promote low-carbon and sustainable transportation, the government should establish an energy ecosystem, formulate corresponding regulations to meet specific needs, and work to reshape the commuter experience. Most important is the need for the government, industry, and consumers to work together to identify trends that meet society’s changing needs.


The Freedom To Choose Not To Consume
Wednesday, February 17, 2021
The Freedom To Choose Not To Consume

James Wang, senior journalist, in Liberty Times (December 1, 2020)

Summary by Alan Yang Gregory (Photo credit: Jason Goh/Pixabay)

The Freedom To Choose Not To Consume

The opposition Kuomintang (KMT) party, which ruled Taiwan under martial law for nearly four decades, continues to produce the most absurd political performances at the most inappropriate of occasions. Instead of behaving maturely under a democracy, they chose to humiliate themselves by throwing pig guts in the parliament to raise the issue of food safety and to protest the government’s decision to allow meat imports from the US. The KMT continue to prove themselves completely incapable of adapting to Taiwan's democracy. Their political judgment remains inferior.

Taiwan is small, and its economic development depends on foreign trade which must comply with international rules. While the government has the responsibility to ensure the safety of food and meet global standards, in a free market, the consumer should ultimately have the freedom to choose what food they wish to consume. In a free market, nobody can force you to consume anything.

American meat will be imported in compliance with international food safety standards. The KMT consistently exaggerates and more and more behaves inappropriately in depriving Taiwan consumers of the right to choose. The KMT want to dictate whether Taiwan people can consume American produce or not.